Dramaquill's All Things Writing

July 27, 2015

My Top Five BEST places to write

Filed under: Writing — dramaquill @ 4:57 PM
Tags: , ,

Some people can write absolutely anywhere…

In the doctor’s waiting room
In line at the supermarket
At the kitchen counter while cooking dinner
At a noisy coffeeshop

You get the idea.

I’d like to say I was one of them, but I’m not.  I need comfortable, inspirational places that channel my creative energy.  I need room to spread out.  And most of all, I need my writing space to be free of distractions.

My Top Five BEST places to write:

5.   The front porch of my house (big windows – lots of light

4.   In my car at Mission Marsh (great scenery with minimal distractions)

3.   Outside on my deck (when weather conditions are just right – not too hot – not too windy)

2.   My home office/desk (when no one else is home)

1.   My bedroom (the twinkle lights that surround the ceiling have to be on)

Where are your BEST places to write?

May 7, 2015

Do you need to work on your time management?

Filed under: Writing — dramaquill @ 2:40 PM
Tags: , , ,

The complaint is always the same:  I don’t have time to write.

Inspirational religious speaker, Joyce Meyer, has a great saying that she uses when she hears people say they don’t have time to study their bibles.  To paraphrase Joyce, basically she tells her listeners that they each have twenty-four hours every day – just the same as everybody else.

When you look at it that way, and you see what others are accomplishing, then technically you DO have the time to write.  But what if you really don’t seem to be able to find the time?

Perhaps a few simple time management skills will help.

  • 1. Set a specific time to write.  Could be first thing in the morning…in your car in the parking lot at work at lunch…before you go to bed…while you are waiting at an appointment…while dinner is cooking.  Schedule it in like everything else in your day.
  • 2. Set a time frame for your writing.  Even if you can only carve out fifteen minutes, five times per week, that would be seventy-five minutes of writing time each and every week.
  • 3. Decide on a writing goal for each session.  Even just a couple of paragraphs is better than no writing at all.
  • 4. Pick the easiest method for the location.  I use a variety including the notebook in my purse, my iPhone’s notes app, my laptop at home, my iPad upstairs.  I have even been known to scribble down some dialogue or plot ideas on the back of a program during intermission at a concert or on a paper bag from a fast food chain.
  • 5. Don’t let the internet or phone calls interrupt you for those fifteen minutes.  If you have to, disconnect from the internet and let your voice mail answer your calls.

Ask yourself this question the next time you start bemoaning your lack of time – How badly do I want it?

If the idea of not writing causes you more stress than the notion that you don’t have time, then you WILL find a way.  If not, perhaps you should leave the writing to those who cannot live without getting those words onto paper.

March 4, 2008

Sidetracked

It’s happened to all writers at one time or another, from the newbie to the seasoned author.  You’re working away at your latest project and bam…life hits you with circumstances that won’t be ignored.

So what about your writing?

Well, if you’ve got a deadline and it’s looming close, don’t disappoint your editor by missing it.  If at all possible, get the assignment finished.  However, if the circumstances won’t allow it, then contact your editor immediately and explain the situation.  But…don’t make this a habit.  If life is always getting in the way of your deadlines, your career will be short lived.

But what if it’s not anything monumental?  What if it’s just life getting in the way?

That’s what I call getting sidetracked.

Sometimes we all get busy…too busy.  Sometimes life throws us a monkey wrench (overtime at work/visiting relatives/not enough sleep) but if we really want to be taken seriously as writers, we have to find ways to keep on track no matter what comes our way.

This past week I’ve been at a music festival with several of the singers from our studio.  Most days I had to be there from early morning until around nine in the evening.  I knew this would be a challenge as far as keeping on track with my writing.

Here are a few things I did to help get through this “crunch” time.  Maybe some of them are tools you already use or maybe they’ll give you some new ideas.

1.     Try to work ahead on a project since you know you won’t have
        much time for a few days.  (I wrote a new chapter for my novel
        revision two days before my schedule got crazy.)

2.     Take a notebook with you and jot down ideas or write even a
        paragraph or two whenever you get even a short break. (I did
        this instead of socializing on the breaks.)

3.     Force yourself to get up even 30 minutes earlier and use that
        time to write or revise.

4.     Stay up 30 minutes later and promise yourself to accomplish
        something before you head to bed (This is tough if you’re really
        tired so for many, early mornings work best.)

5.     Whenever you’re driving, use a portable recording device to keep
         track of any thoughts about your project, or keep a what to do
         list of things for the next day.

6.     Eat well and get enough rest so that you stay healthy.  Also, if you
        are sleep deprived, it’s much harder to be creative.

7.      Know that this glitch in your regular writing routine won’t last
         forever and make plans to work a little harder/longer as soon as
         you can.

8.     Don’t get discouraged if you have abandoned your project for a
        few days.  Get back on track as soon as you can.

Life can be full of sidetracks.  Don’t let your writing take a backseat to all of them.  Know when you really have no choice and when you just have to be flexible and adjust your schedule.

When our performing arts students begin preparing for an audition or a performance, I always ask them, “How badly do you want it?” whenever they get sidetracked.

You say you’re a writer?

How badly do you want it?

December 27, 2007

How do the holidays alter your writing habits?

Usually all the prequel to Christmas (the shopping, baking, wrapping, socializing) are my excuses, or should I say reasons, for not doing as much writing as I’d like.  But the past couple of years I found lots of ways to make sure I found time to create.  Here are a few ideas for you:

 1.    Take a notebook with you when you shop and make sure to use
        a cart.  That way, while you are in line, you can jot down neat
        snippets of conversation, excellent character descriptions and
        ideas for new stories.

2.     Plan a coffee break during your shopping trip and while you sip
        a hot cup of cocoa or a mocha latte, write down a description of
        the coffee shop, what you are tasting, seeing, hearing…anything.

3.     Use a portable tape recorder and record ideas that come to you
        while you wrap presents.  Maybe one of the items, or the person
        to whom it will be given to may inspire an article or a story.

4.    I have an excellent memory for detail so when I attend a party or
       social event, I replay it the next day and jot down interesting
       conversations or characters from the night before.

5.   When baking cookies, cut out all the shapes at once and then, while
       each batch bakes, work on revising a chapter of your novel or
       make a list of good ideas for Christmas articles that you can sub
       out for next year’s magazine deadlines.

6.    Give up one TV program (60 minute length is best) and use it to
        write on one of your current projects.

7.     Plan to browse in a bookstore for gift ideas and while you’re there,
        check out the writing section.

Get creative!

I’m sure you can figure out lots of your own ways to steal some writing time over the busy holiday season.

And at the very least, make a new year’s resolution to write everyday…even if it’s only for 10-15 minutes.

Of course, I don’t have to tell you all this.  Anyone hooked on writing can’t go a day without doing it. 

Stephen King writes everyday. Do you?

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.