Dramaquill's All Things Writing

May 31, 2015

Writing to get published

What kind of writer are you?

Does everything you write have to get published for you to feel like you’re a writer?

Do you ever just write because you have a brain overflowing with ideas?

I think (and this is just my opinion) that if you write solely for the purpose of getting those words published, you may be in for a disappointing time.  I’ve written some fine sentences – maybe even some fine paragraphs that will likely never make it to an editor’s desk.  Sometimes, you just have to be willing to write it and let it go.

But that doesn’t make you less of a writer, now does it?

I truly believe the best writers are those who write consistently…all the time.  They won’t see every single word they’ve ever put to paper come to life in the form of a book, short story, article or essay.  But they will have known the satisfaction of getting those words down and creating a body of work that is meaningful.

Lots of great writing never gets published.  How saf, though, if because of that, it was never written.

What kind of writer are you?

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July 13, 2008

You never know who may be reading what you’ve written

When I first started subbing out my work, I listened to the advice of more experienced writers as I worked on getting some clips in my portfolio:  Start with smaller publishers/publications first.

So, that’s what I did.

Although I had more rejections than acceptances at first, it wasn’t long before I was able to get a few articles accepted, for pay, by ezines and websites.  I also cracked some of the smaller children’s magazines and ezines, allowing my first kidlit poems a chance to be read by a wider audience than the children at our studio.

I’m thankful that a lot of these smaller publishers accept work on its merit, rather than the reputation or publishing record of the submitter.  If it weren’t for them, would any of us newbies ever get our feet in the door?

More recently, as many of you know, I’ve turned my focus to two areas.  One, my first adult suspense novel and two, writing plays for our drama students.  I’ve managed to sell some of my playscripts to middle school drama clubs and children’s programs at some smaller professional theatres.  I’m working on my novel’s final revision so it can start making the rounds with agents and editors.

But last week, to my surprise, I received a very interesting email from an editor of Writer’s Digest books.  It seems that he is putting together a new “market” book and wanted to know if I still had rights to an article he’d read online. 

I was amazed.

I was also fairly certain I hadn’t sold anything other than the electronic rights to this article in question, so I checked.  Yes, I still had all other rights.  So, I emailed him the exact information and he responded with an offer to include my article in Writer’s Digest’s newest market book, coming out in December of this year. We are currently in the process of doing some tweaking and negotiating the contract. 

I’ll publish more details once the contract is signed and everything’s a go for sure.

But this brings up two very interesting points about the power of the internet and having a web presence.

1.   
The editor told me they almost never reprint articles that were originally published online but my article caught his eye because of its appropriateness”
to the new book

2.   
This article was written back in 2000 and sold to a small online writing website ezine.  I had cracked a small market and was happy to have been accepted for publication.

And now, several years later, a piece I wrote for one of the smaller publishers is now going to debut with one of the biggest.

So always write with integrity and submit your best work.  You never know who may be reading what you’ve written.

January 6, 2008

Free ezines for writers

The internet has a ton of resources for all kinds of writers, covering all sorts of topics.  And the best part of all is – there are a plethora of FREE ones.  Check out some of the ones listed below:

http://www.betterwritingskills.com/newsletter.html
Help with proper word usage, grammar, punctuation and more.

http://writesuccess.com/id66.html
Covers a wide variety of topics for all writers

http://www.writing-world.com/newsletter/index.shtml
Articles on the business and craft of writing

http://www.absolutewrite.com/
One of my favorite ezines

http://www.fictionfactor.com/
For fiction writers

http://www.fundsforwriters.com/FFWnewsletters.htm
Hope Clark offers 3 newsletters:  Fundsfor Writers, FundsforWriters small markets and Writing Kid, a newsletter for children/teens

http://www.internetwritingjournal.com/
Wide variety of information, even includes songwriting

http://www.writergazette.com/
Wide variety of information including job markets

http://www.writersweekly.com/
One of the best free ezines on the web

http://www.write4kids.com/pub.html
Great resource for those who write for kids and teens

These are just a few of the great, free ezines offered to writers on the web.  With such a wealth of free information, no writer needs to feel unable to expand their knowledge, research in their chosen genre or lack information about every facet of being a writer.

So what are you waiting for?  Start clicking those links.

December 27, 2007

How do the holidays alter your writing habits?

Usually all the prequel to Christmas (the shopping, baking, wrapping, socializing) are my excuses, or should I say reasons, for not doing as much writing as I’d like.  But the past couple of years I found lots of ways to make sure I found time to create.  Here are a few ideas for you:

 1.    Take a notebook with you when you shop and make sure to use
        a cart.  That way, while you are in line, you can jot down neat
        snippets of conversation, excellent character descriptions and
        ideas for new stories.

2.     Plan a coffee break during your shopping trip and while you sip
        a hot cup of cocoa or a mocha latte, write down a description of
        the coffee shop, what you are tasting, seeing, hearing…anything.

3.     Use a portable tape recorder and record ideas that come to you
        while you wrap presents.  Maybe one of the items, or the person
        to whom it will be given to may inspire an article or a story.

4.    I have an excellent memory for detail so when I attend a party or
       social event, I replay it the next day and jot down interesting
       conversations or characters from the night before.

5.   When baking cookies, cut out all the shapes at once and then, while
       each batch bakes, work on revising a chapter of your novel or
       make a list of good ideas for Christmas articles that you can sub
       out for next year’s magazine deadlines.

6.    Give up one TV program (60 minute length is best) and use it to
        write on one of your current projects.

7.     Plan to browse in a bookstore for gift ideas and while you’re there,
        check out the writing section.

Get creative!

I’m sure you can figure out lots of your own ways to steal some writing time over the busy holiday season.

And at the very least, make a new year’s resolution to write everyday…even if it’s only for 10-15 minutes.

Of course, I don’t have to tell you all this.  Anyone hooked on writing can’t go a day without doing it. 

Stephen King writes everyday. Do you?

October 1, 2007

All things writing

Check out my new blogsite for all things writing.  You’ll find useful articles and tips about different genres as well as submitting, formatting, book recommendations and any other useful tidbits.

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