Dramaquill's All Things Writing

April 22, 2012

Don’t be a Loner: My cure for Writer’s Block

  Bookmark and Share

There have been times when I’ve been working on one of my manuscripts and I just can’t seem to produce ten coherent words.  Yep – that dreaded writer’s block!

Writer’s block used to panic me.  What if I never get any more ideas?  What if my writing ability has dried up?  I’m sure you’ve all been there at some time or other.

For the most part, writing is a solitary activity, unless you happen to be collaborating with another writer on a project.  But let’s face it, most of a writer’s working time is spent alone.

All that alone time is great when your creative juices are flowing but it can become pretty debilitating when the words stop coming.  Yes, you can get up and move around.  You can check your email, make a snack, phone a friend or do a million other things to get you back on track.  None of these have ever worked for me.  All it does it take me further away from figuring out how to get back to writing.

But, if I talk to another writer, whether in an email from my online critique group, or in person with another local writer, it doesn’t take long before I’m excited to get back to one of my projects. 

Just the other day, I opened up the file for my second suspense novel and realized that I’ve hit a brick wall.  I haven’t been able to spend as much time working on it these past few months and the entire story has just stalled.  I really need to finish it and submit it to my publisher by summer. 

Then, yesterday, I had a great conversation with an author I know who is on her fifth revision of her first novel.  A ten minute conversation and I could hardly wait to get home and get writing.  Just ten minutes and my writer’s battery recharged.

This isn’t the first time that connecting with another writer has inspired me.  I cherish my online critique group.  Every time I feel sidetracked or wonder if I’ll ever write another intelligent word, I just need to interact with these writers for a bit and wham – writer’s block gone!

And it usually isn’t a conversation about me, my writing or even writer’s block that gets me going again.  It could be an email that one of the group just got picked up by an agent.  Perhaps it’s a fabulous chapter, written by someone in the group, that I have to critique.  It could even be the mention of a new contest or opportunity that might be of interest to someone in the group.

All I know is that the quickest way for me to get out of my own writer’s block is to connect with another writer.

How do you handle your periods of writer’s block?

Advertisements

April 3, 2012

Writing and Competitive Sports

  Arts Blogs - Blog Top Sites Bookmark and Share

The other morning, reading through several popular writing ezines, I got somewhat caught up in  the guidelines for many upcoming writing contests, which got me to thinking about writing in a new way.

As writers, we are constantly competing for our chance to be published – our “win”, so to speak.  Winning a contest is somewhat like winning a sporting championship, isn’t it? 

Sports team coaches drill their players on skills and techniques that will ultimately make them stronger, better players and therefore, a more successful team.  Writers hone their skills and techniques in order to become better wordsmiths who can produce stronger, more saleable manuscripts.

For both, the ultimate prize is the win!

Writers have to compete with one another all the time for everything from pieces in magazines and newspapers to contracts with agents and publishers.  To me, winning an acceptance for publication is akin to winning a sports championship.  Exhilarating and satisfying.

To succeed, both the team sport player and the writer do several things:

1.      Make their activity a priority
2.      Constantly work on improving their skills and techniques
3.      Seek out opportunities for learning new things
4.      Enter competitions
5.      Look to mentors for coaching and critiquing
6.      Expect nothing less than their best

I was never very good at competitive sports.  I think I’m doing much better as a writer.

Do you treat your writing like a competitive sport? 

Are you doing everything you can to be the best you can be?

October 12, 2011

Getting ebook reviews

Arts Blogs - Blog Top Sites Bookmark and Share

Every author wants feedback, but getting book reviews can be time consuming and challenging. 

Here’s where I think that having an ebook provides a real advantage.

According to statistics, over two billion people use the internet on a regular basis.  That’s two billion potential customers for your ebook and the potential for tons of feedback.

So how do you go about getting the word out to reviewers?

Well, in my case, I submitted my book to an actual publisher (not a vanity press) so that I’d have the clout of my publishing company to help publicize my book.  My publisher submits all their books to many different review sites so they’ve already done a big chunk of the work for me.

But don’t despair if you did decide to self publish.  You can google “ebook reviewers” and get lots of results from blogs (where the owner has already compiled lists for you) to other sites that list ebook review sites.  Here are a few to get you started:

http://www.ebookcrossroads.com/ebook-reviewers.html

http://www.tinahunter.ca/links/ebook-reviewers/

http://www.twilighttimes.com/practical_tips4.html  (scroll down the page to find reviewers)

Getting reviews not only hooks potential new customers into buying your ebook but having numerous reviews also means that your ebook’s title will show up with more results with search engines. 

My suspense novel has been reviewed on amazon.com, the Pen and Muse, Coffee Time Romance and most recently on Pulist http://www.pulist.net/when-love-wont-die.html

It may take some time but keep contacting reviewers online.  All it costs is a free download of your ebook.  And don’t forget to encourage everyone who’s read your book to go and post a review wherever it’s available.

Don’t be discouraged if you submit to review sites and don’t get a review.  Just make sure you submit.

September 14, 2011

Download-file.net SCAM SITE update

Arts Blogs - Blog Top Sites Bookmark and Share

Just an update to my previous post on this site that appears to be illegally offering content for free download.

Several writers have gone to the site and found that their books were indeed posted without their permission.  Many contacted their publishers and also contacted the site.

Some members of my critique group and also some from my publisher decided to search everything from big name authors to complete jibberish and guess what?  Yep – everything and anything searched came back with results.

So fear not, fellow writers.  Although the site makes it appear that your books have been stolen, it’s unlikely that the site has any legitimate content whatsoever.

But here’s the real warning…

In order to download content, one must join the site and pay the introductory trial fee of $4.99.  That means divulging credit card info. 

DON’T DO IT!

I contacted Angela Hoy of writersweekly.com earlier this week and her thoughts were that perhaps the download links are viruses.  So, if you pay to join the trial membership and then click on one of the downloads to see if it’s really your book, you could end up inviting a virus into your computer.

The beauty of the internet is that we are all connected and getting information out is relatively easy and extremely quick.

As far as download-file.net is concerned…DANGER WIL ROBINSON!

September 9, 2011

Writers Beware: Someone may be stealing your book right now!

Arts Blogs - Blog Top Sites Bookmark and Share

I’ve made it a habit to google myself and my book title monthly.  Usually I’m pleasantly surprised at the new sites that have picked up my book and offered it for sale in their online stores or new reviews from new readers. 

That wasn’t the case this month.

In fact, I found illegal copies of my book in numerous digital formats all offered for download at the following site:

http://download-file.net

They DO NOT have permission to offer my book for download, free or otherwise.

They DID NOT contact my publisher or myself.

They ARE STEALING from me and from my publisher.

My editor contacted them and so did I.  I got back a bogus link to click that apparently was the tracking page to this incident.  It was given a fancy incident number and everything.  But the page doesn’t exist.

I found someone else who’s had the same problem.  They also have tried numerous ways to contact the site owners but never get any response.

Isn’t it difficult enough for new writers to make it in this biz without the unscrupulous thieves who choose to steal from someone else in order to make money.

How do they make money?

If you want to download anything from their site, you pay $4.99 for a one month trial membership.  Otherwise, if you’re a non-paid member, you can’t download anything.

Writers Beward:  Download-file.net may be stealing a copy of your book right now!

June 7, 2011

E-book format: Does this mean self-published? NO!

Arts Blogs - Blog Top Sites Bookmark and Share
 

I’ve had this topic on my mind for a while now as I continue to see and hear comments that if it’s an e-book, it was self-published.

The e-book format does lend itself to self-publishing, for obvious reasons:

  • cheaper to reproduce than print books
  • quicker turnaround time
  • digital books are becoming more popular
  • invention of the e-reader
  • portability (can carry an entire library of books with you in one small device)

But I’m frustrated that the general assumption is that if one has published an e-book, then it must be self-published.  This couldn’t be further from the truth.

More and more new publishers (as well as some of the big houses) are developing and offering e-books.  For first-time authors trying to break into the business, this is great news.  Because an e-book doesn’t cost as much to reproduce as a print book, e-publishers may be more willing to contract a new writer who doesn’t yet have agent representation.  That doesn’t mean your manuscript can be less than amazing.  E-publishers offering contracts are going to be just as diligent about publishing books that have engaging characters, page-turning plots and brilliant writing.  Many e-publishers also do publish books that have generated a decent amount of sales into print versions.

Here are some e-pubs who offer contracts, editing, cover designs, ISBNs, royalties and the chance to be seen and read by the millions of people already enjoying downloading books onto their Kindle or iPad rather than lugging around yet another paperback in their purse or backpack…

http://www.redrosepublishing.com

http://www.echelonpress.com/

http://www.literaryroad.com/index.php

http://museituppublishing.com/

http://www.newconceptspublishing.com/about.html

http://www.synergebooks.com/aboutus.html

http://whiskeycreekpress.com/submissions.shtml

http://lionhearted.com/index.html

This list is just a sampling of the different e-book publishers actively pursuing manuscripts at the current time. 

As with any submission, make sure to do your research on any publisher you choose to target before sending off your query and your manuscript.  Follow any submission guidelines to the letter.  Check out the types of books published to see if what you have written fits into the publisher’s catalogue and style.

E-books are gaining popularity and e-publishers are an excellent way to break into the traditional publishing business.

May 30, 2011

How do you handle negative feedback?

Arts Blogs - Blog Top Sites


Bookmark and Share

I’ve always been a firm believer in getting constructive criticism on my work. I belong to a critique group and have nothing but the utmost respect for the other members. I know that they spend a great deal of time reading what I submit for critique. They see things not only through the eyes of other writers but as readers as well.

As a writer, I need to write what I’m passionate about but I also need to write for my readers. If nobody enjoys reading my work, then I’m no longer effective as a writer. I don’t want my writing to be self-indulgent.

But the very nature of asking for feedback means that people are going to tell me what they think. That’s right – what THEY think. Not what I want them to think. Sometimes, they don’t like what they read.

So how do I handle negative criticisms?

First of all, they have to be constructive. A comment like “This chapter sucks” is neither constructive nor helpful. But comment like “This chapter had a lot of description and not much action and I found that it didn’t hold my interest” give me something to think about.

When I get negative feedback, I have a three-fold plan for how I deal with it:

DIGEST

SIMMER

DECIDE

Upon initial reading, it’s often hard to see past the criticism. Instead of having an immediate reaction, I try to just read through everything to get an idea of what the reader thought. Then, I put the critique away so that I can digest everything that’s been said.

Next, I leave the writing to simmer for a few days. Usually, I get antsy to get working on it again and that’s my meter for how long to let it simmer.

Finally, I go back and read every comment, one at a time, and decide whether or not I agree with what has been said. If I do feel inclined to try the critiquer’s suggestion, then I do some rewriting and see what happens. If the changes truly do make it read better, then I’m grateful for the suggestion. If not, sometimes I let it simmer some more. If I strongly disagree and don’t feel that the comment warrants any rewriting, then I leave my original words.

It’s difficult to receive feedback, especially when it’s not positive but if it’s constructive, then it warrants my attention.

I have had what I’ll refer to as “mean” critiques (not from my current group who I’ve been with for many years now). It’s hard not to let those comments bring you down and question your writing but I’ve come to the conclusion that when someone just rips your work apart without a valid reason or explanation, then I need to just toss that aside and instead, rely on the comments that can and do make my writing better.

How do you handle negative criticisms?

May 16, 2011

What is it that makes a really great writer great?

 Arts Blogs - Blog Top Sites


Bookmark and Share

Ever since I embarked on my writing  journey, I’ve read everything I could get my hands on where writing is concerned.

  •  Articles on show, don’t tell. 
  • Interviews with agents and editors on what works when submitting and what turns them off immediately. 
  • Discussions on POV

I’ve also been an active participant in two online critique groups, as well as joining writers’ organizations and attending writing conferences.

But I still have to wonder:  What is it that makes a really great writer great?

Here are a few things I think help contribute to a writer’s greatness:

  • unique voice
  • consistency in the writing
  • strong, solid plots
  • characters that behave like real people (readers can relate to them)
  • stories that surprise and entertain us
  • descriptive writing that immediately paints a vivid visual

Above all, however, I think it goes deeper than the ability to craft an amazing story. 

To me, a great writer is passionate about the entire process.  These aren’t just words on a page.  It’s time invested in painstakingly scupting every detail until it’s the absolute best writing it can be.  A great writer writes what stirs them up – stories they have to tell.

Don’t write to market trends.

Don’t settle for anything less than your best writing…ever.

Don’t sub pieces out without doing your homework on the publishers you’ve chosen.

But what is the biggest thing that makes a really great writer great?

NEVER GIVE UP!

March 16, 2011

Author interviews & online press releases

  Arts Blogs - Blog Top Sites


Bookmark and Share

Another great way to promote your book is to promote yourself as an author.  There are always ezines and websites looking to interview new authors.  Link these pages to your Facebook page or your website to actively drive more possible readers in the direction of your book(s).

Also, take advantage of FREE press releases online to announce your new book(s) or any events, like speaking engagements, booksignings etc.

http://www.sellingbooks.com/jacqueline-mcmahon-when-love-wont-die
by Cathy B. Stucker

http://www.writersmanual.com/show.php?id=2&uid=1018
sister site to Writers Gazette and eBooksCafe

http://www.wireservice.ca/index.php?module=News&func=display&sid=3871

http://yewalus.blogspot.com/2011/02/books-that-are-out-there-romantic.html

Are you doing everything you can to promote yourself and your books?

January 9, 2011

2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Fresher than ever.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A helper monkey made this abstract painting, inspired by your stats.

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 1,400 times in 2010. That’s about 3 full 747s.

In 2010, there were 23 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 124 posts. There was 1 picture uploaded, taking a total of 272kb.

The busiest day of the year was October 18th with 23 views. The most popular post that day was How to write a novel – web resources.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were rayannecarr.wordpress.com, facebook.com, mail.yahoo.com, en.wordpress.com, and mail.live.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for how to get a play published, how to get your play published, get your play published, ezines for writers, and how do i get my play published.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

How to write a novel – web resources November 2008
3 comments and 1 Like on WordPress.com,

2

Where to get your play published September 2008

3

Contest entry fees: To pay or not to pay February 2009
4 comments

4

Resources for writers of Suspense May 2010
2 comments

5

Suspense novels – are they really so easy to write? March 2009

October 25, 2010

When Love Won’t Die Reviews

Arts Blogs - Blog Top Sites


Bookmark and Share

The ebook version of my suspense novel, “When Love Won’t Die”, has been out for about three weeks now and the reviews are starting to come in.  I’m thrilled to say that so far, it’s been two thumbs up from everyone who’s read the book. 

Here are a few quotes:

Sandy Carlson (novel writer and columnist from Michigan)
McMahon makes her characters seem so real and alive, I seriously recommend that this gripping story not be read after dark.

Cyndy Fairbrother (avid novel reader from Saskachewan)
I’ve probably read over five hundred books, and I only remember the good stories. I’ll remember When Love Won’t Die!

Erin-Brie Warwick (Warwick Life Strategies – Winnipeg)
The book is fantastic!! I’m about 1/3 of the way through…probably won’t sleep well tonight though haha.

Alison Gigliotti (avid reader of ebooks – Thunder Bay)
BTW wicked good score on the cover. I have bought many many ebooks and I gotta say, some of the covers are horrendous.

As an author, it’s definitely encouraging to read comments like these and know that what you have written has been well received by those who have purchased the ebook. 

But what if you haven’t published a book?  How can you get feedback?  Do you trust the opinions of your family and friends?

Do like I did:

  • Join a writing group in the city where you live
  • Join a critique group (either online or in person) where you can get constructive
    feedback
  • Attend writing conferences
  • Read books in the same genre as what you are writing
  • Learn everything you can about the publishing business
  • Research publishers that you feel have the right fit for your book by studying their submission guidelines and reading books they’ve published
  • Make sure the manuscript you are submitting is nothing short of your very best writing

Now…on to plan the booksigning.  I’ll post info. on the event when I’ve nailed down all the details.

And don’t forget – getting the book out is just the first step.  Now it’s up to you to seek out marketing opportunities and sell those copies.

August 24, 2010

Short on cash? FREE online writing courses.

 Arts Blogs - Blog Top Sites


Bookmark and Share

Do you want to try your hand at writing and don’t know how to start?

Are you finding it hard to justify paying for a writing program until you see whether or not writing is really something you want to do?

Have you written a rough draft of a book or screenplay and want to know if you’re on the right track?

Here are some FREE online writing courses that may help those who are struggling to decide whether or not they want to pursue a career in writing.   This is just a list and none of the courses are endorsed by me nor do I have any relationships to any of the websites/teachers/programs etc.

Check them out – you never know what you might learn.

 http://storymind.com/channels/writerschannel/
Each lesson is in streaming video & audio.

http://www.lifewrite.com/html/class.htm
Free screenwriting course taught by a former UCLA professor

http://education-portal.com/articles/10_Universities_Offering_Free_Writing_Courses_Online.html
Free online writing courses from 10 different universities

http://www.collegedegree.com/library/college-life/50-Open-courseware-writing-classes
50+ free online writing courses (mostly MIT)

These sites seem to be a good place to start and also actually have free lessons.  Many search results lead to sites that don’t so hopefully you’ll find something of interest here.

Another amazing online resource is free articles.  They can be found absolutely everywhere.  Google your genre and you’ll find blogs and websites filled with free information and advice, much of it from professionals already successful in the writing biz.

So if you don’t have the money to take writing classes, don’t let that stop you from following your muse into the world of writing.

August 13, 2010

How to Write that excellent first chapter for your Novel

Arts Blogs - Blog Top Sites


Bookmark and Share

Nothing is more important than the opening chapter of any novel.  As a writer, you have to hook your potential reader, often within the first couple of paragraphs.  If you do not have a strong opening and an enticing first chapter, chances are you won’t even get your book in print, let alone sell any copies.

 So how do you make your writing stand out from its competition?

 There are several scenarios to entice a potential reader:

 ¨      Conflict:   Have two people engaged in a heated argument

¨      Excitement:  Use a situation, like a first-time experience or arriving at an interesting destination or holding a winning lottery ticket

¨      Suspense:  Someone is being watched or followed

¨      Attraction:  Your main character has just entered a room and immediately feels an undeniable attraction to someone else

¨      Character:  Introduce us to someone unlike anyone we’ve ever met before.  Create strong characters with three-dimensional personalities so that we’ll care what happens to them

¨      Pace:  Keep the writing moving – don’t weigh it down with too much description

¨      Excellent Writing:  Strong prose/vivid language/active not passive/engaging

¨      New Ideas:  Don’t be cliché.  Make sure you’re writing something new, not just another version of what’s already been overdone.

Never settle for your first draft.  Writing is a craft that must be honed and tweaked until you create your very best.  You can achieve this in a number of ways:

 ¨      Read first chapters of published books in your genre and analyze what makes you want to keep reading

¨      Join a critique group (either online or in person) and get feedback

¨      Pay a professional to critique your work

¨      Put your chapter away for a few days and re-read it with fresh eyes, noting where you can make it stronger

¨      Revise…revise…revise until your writing sparkles

¨      Aim for your absolute best – don’t settle for anything less

¨      Watch out for careless errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar

¨      Read books on writing to hone your craft

¨      write…write…write – practice makes perfect after all

¨      Take courses online, by correspondence or at accredited institutions

 Ask yourself what makes you pick up a book and read it through to the end?  Start there.  If you write something you know you’d want to read, chances are others will want to read it too.

 From all that I’ve read from editors, publishers and agents, many writers submit work that just isn’t their best effort.  Don’t let that be you!

January 26, 2010

To be a successful Writer – Part 3

 Arts Blogs - Blog Top Sites

This next quality, patience, is one that I struggle with every single day.  By nature, I’m just not a patient person and I really have to take a breath and practise this quality.

If you really want to be a successful writer, you won’t survive without patience.

Have you ever submitted your work to a contest, publisher or agent?  Then you’ll know what I mean.  Either the wait times are so long (up to a year) or the guidelines state that you’ll only be contacted if they are interested in your submission.

Writers need to develop an ability to let go of their work once they’ve sent it out to someone.  With such long waiting periods, it’s the only way to survive.

And what do you do while you’re waiting?

You continue to write, revise and sub more pieces.  And, you continue to wait.

Waiting can be one of life’s biggest stress factors for those who cannot come to terms with being patient.

And with patience comes something else that I struggle with…not getting annoyed or restless while I’m waiting.  That’s the second half of patience and really the only way to survive in this business. 

But waiting to hear back on submissions isn’t the only area where a writer must embody patience.  Here are a few others:

  1. Waiting for your work to come out in print  (many magazines are
    buying pieces for issues 4 & 5 yrs. into the future).  Seeing your
    book in print can take years as well.  With editing, cover design,
    printing and binding the copies and distributing them to sellers, it’s
    a very lengthy process.
  2. Even with the excitement of having your writing accepted, there’s
    always a wait before the cheque arrives in your mailbox.  With many
    magazines paying on publication, you might have an acceptance
    in 2008 but the piece won’t be out until 2012, which is when you
    will receive payment.  Even publishers who pay on acceptance still
    take a couple of months at the least to send payment.
  3. Once your book is out there, you have to promote it and many
    writers do book signings, interviews and speaking engagements to
    get their name and the name of their book into the public eye.  With
    so much competition, not only from other authors but other sources
    of creative entertainment as well, promoting your book will be a
    time-consuming endeavour.

But above all, there is one area, more than any other, where you MUST be able to demonstrate your deepest form of patience, and that is when it applies to your writing and revising.  If you’ve never written a book before, it’s going to take patience to get it all down as well as organizing your plot, developing your characters and churning out that first draft.  Then, it will require more patience than you might imagine as you begin revising and rewriting. 

And impatient writer will not keep at it until the manuscript is the best possible version of the end product, likely sending out a subpar submission, resulting in a guaranteed rejection.

Have the patience to develop your patience.

January 15, 2010

To be a successful writer – Part 2

Tenacious (taken from http://dictionary.reference.com/)

 1. holding fast; characterized by keeping a firm hold (often fol. by of): a tenacious grip on my arm; tenacious of old habits.

 

2. highly retentive: a tenacious memory.

3.pertinacious, persistent, stubborn, or obstinate.

 

 4.adhesive or sticky; viscous or glutinous.

5.holding together; cohesive; not easily pulled asunder; tough

Out of all the qualities I’ve thought about in compiling this series, tenacity (being tenacious) is by far what has served me best over the years.  I actually believe that the other qualities, which I reveal in successive parts of this series, stem from being tenacious.

Let’s look at the five different definitions from the dictionary and how I believe they apply to becoming a successful writer…

1.  holding fast; characterized by keeping a firm hold (often fol. by of): a tenacious grip on my arm; tenacious of old habits. If you’re serious about writing you must keep a firm hold on your goals.  If you want to become a published novelist, for example, you must create the habit of writing each and every day, devoid of distractions, if you ever want to complete that first draft.  Life offers many distractions and building good writing habits, and sticking to them, will definitely move you in the right direction.  With discipline toward your craft, you can, and will, accomplish your goals.

 

 2.highly retentive: a tenacious memory.Writers must be able to focus on a multitude of details.  In novel writing there are settings , plot points, character traits and story arcs to deal with.  A tenacious memory will make keeping it all straight a much easier task.  But besides the actual writing, you’ll have to remember contest deadlines, submissions that you’ve got out to publishers/agents and countless other details on the business side of writing.

3.pertinacious, persistent, stubborn, or obstinate. Luckily, as a Taurus, my natural personality contains many of these, but if it didn’t, these traits are definitely necessary to further your career.  Think of those pertinacious salespeople that follow you around the store, not letting up until they have you engaged.  Be persistent about what you want as a writer, stubborn about getting it and obstinate when someone or something tries to stand in your way.

 

 4.adhesive or sticky; viscous or glutinous. Maybe this one’s a bit of a stretch (no pun intended), but I see this definition as sticking to your plans…sticking to your schedule…sticking to your goals.  Like adhesive sticks two objects together, the writer must stick to the task of creating words, finishing manuscripts and seeking a home for each project.

 

 5. holding together; cohesive; not easily pulled asunder; toughTo be a successful writer, you can’t be a softie – a pushover.  Ask yourself, how badly do I want this?  Then formulate your plan, cohesively integrating it into your life and your current schedule.  Be tough – make the sacrifices necessary to find the time to write, if that’s what you really have a passion to do.

And remember that being a successful writer, although my definition of that means writing for paid publication, can mean something entirely different to you.  But however you see that success, you must be tenacious if you want to get there.

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.