Dramaquill's All Things Writing

September 18, 2012

Teaching Drama inspired me to get back to writing

As the owner of a performing arts studio, my schedule becomes almost overwhelming from late August through mid September.  It’s both exhilarating and exhausting.

I’ve now entered the phase where all of my classes have begun and I’m re-connecting with former students as well as meeting new ones.  It’s an exciting time at my studio.

Saturday was the first day of classes and as it happens, all of our drama programs are on Saturday.

First up was the 6-10 year old group.  As we all played a fun drama game to learn each other’s names, I saw snippets of creativity begin to emerge.  Even the shy children were eager to say and do something that would make everyone remember them.  The collective energy in the drama room produced an encouraging atmosphere where the students felt themselves trying things outside of their comfort zones and enjoying it.

The second group consisted of the 11-17 year old crowd.  This diverse group ranged from kids with plenty of creative experience to others with absolutely none.  Interestingly enough, as we worked on a variety of group and individual activities, this group definitely had a noticeable split between the “up for anything” creative types and the “shy and guarded” individuals, however, by the end of the class, the split had weakened considerably.

Finally, the last class, a large group of students ages 9-18 entered the studio.  Many of these kids have taken programs with us before, however there was also a handful of newcomers.  One might think that such a mix of ages would result in chaos, but the opposite took place.  Different levels of creativity took shape as we integrated ages and abilities, familiar and unfamiliar.  The creative energy became infectious during the ninety minute session.

You’re probably all wondering what any of this has to do with writing.

Writing alone is great when your creativity flows and the words just spew out of you and on to the page.  But as we all know, there are also times when the complete opposite happens.

Creativity grows when surrounded by creativity.

Join a writing group.

Talk to other writers.

Talk to potential readers.

Read books that aren’t in your comfort zone and see how you feel when you’re done.

Participate in a critique group.

I always feel more inspired and creative after I’ve done any one of these things.  It just took me a day of teaching drama to remember how great it is to interact.

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2 Comments »

  1. I loved hearing about your different age groups I loved listening to you talk about their interactions and creaivitiy. I also liked the parallel to writing — that we need one another. Thanks for being there for me, Jaclyn, through the thick and the thin.

    Comment by sandycarl — September 18, 2012 @ 8:49 PM | Reply

    • Right back atcha, my friend.
      That’s what I love about the internet – anyone living anywhere can find other writers to connect with. With my job, I can’t attend the local writers’ group meeting because they are on a Wed evening and I’m always teaching. I love the BQs and I really don’t think I’d ever have been so productive if it wasn’t for finding you ladies. I also feel like we’ve made some really great friendships within the group. I still hope that one day we can all get together somewhere for a weekend BQ writing/friendship workshop.

      Comment by dramaquill — September 19, 2012 @ 11:54 AM | Reply


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